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Creativity IS a Spiritual Practice

When we see through our hearts, we recognize that every single one of us is infused with creativity. Divine Sparks are embedded in everyone and everything. It's up to us to be courageous, to look and listen deeply, to find the sparks, gather and release them back into the universe, transformed into something new. Join me as we wake up to the sacred-ordinary blessings waiting to greet us each and every day.

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Sunday, March 13, 2011

Picasso, Impasto, Impossible NOT to Pray


Woman Seated in a Chair, Pablo Picasso, 1941
We started our weekend outing with lunch at a local cafe, followed by a visit to the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester, NH. It's been over a year since I was last at an art museum. And there I was viewing this Picasso from a seated position in my wheelchair (Doesn't it look like her chair has little wheels too?) My height afforded me a view I would not have had standing up and so I took these macro photos to share with you!  (No flash, don't worry).



I had not heard the news yet, Friday morning when we left, so I didn't even know about the earthquake and tsunami in Japan until we were settled in our hotel room later in the afternoon. Our hearts were heavy as we sat and viewed the impossible to comprehend footage on the TV. I visualized the broken woman on the chair. I know Picasso’s intention was not to portray a “broken” woman, but in that moment I was feeling the intensity of a world filled with human beings fragmented by sorrow, by the force of the earth coming apart at it’s seams, a wall of water devastating everything in it’s unstoppable path, and her fractured image filled my mind’s eye. I too am a broken woman in a chair after all. We are all One. I did what I always do when I am saddened or frightened, grateful or relieved. I prayed. I prayed silently as I turned the mala beads on my wrist (a gift I had received in the mail that morning from a dear, dear friend) while we watched the news unfold on CNN. As my fingers touched each bead on the bracelet, my heart released a silent prayer. As I inhaled I offered prayers for the dead and for the survivors, prayers for the families and the rescue workers, prayers that kept circling round and round as I contemplated all of the people suffering in Japan and all of the individuals who fill the whole earth who might also be in pain. With each exhale I released prayers of lovingkindness and compassion, safety and peace for all beings everywhere, including myself. Late in the evening I offered prayers of gratitude when I found that a blogger friend I know in Japan and his family were safe, then more prayers of gratitude even though so many people had perished and others were missing, because thank God, many had survived. That felt pretty miraculous.

Floods and fires, wars and hunger, illness and poverty, at times like this, suffering seems to have no beginning and no end, it is part of existence and has been since the dawn of time, and yet how can one NOT pray for ease for all beings, even if that ease lasts for only a single in-breath and a single out-breath? For me, that would be impossible.

The wheels of my chair… circles. The impasto on the painting… a pattern of small circles. The beads on my mala… smooth like stone marbles strung with care to form a circle; bead kissing bead. The earth is spherical and the seasons cycle round. Life and death shift seamlessly from the first inhale at birth to a final exhale.... until a new being is born and it all begins again; breath kissing breath.



35 comments:

  1. "breath kissing breath."

    yes. a circle, i keep thinking of this, too. how one person is living in a moment of peace while another suffers. yet the person in the light has faith to pray for the one in the dark, to lift them up. and when the circle turns around again, we are lifted up by another...

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  2. Those photos you took are beautiful and very abstract, in that view the Implast of Picasso, are impressive.
    Japan's tragedy we all have touched my soul so much desolation.Saludos.

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  3. And those circles seem to be gone in an instant. Our lives are so small and inconsequential when we see such devastating and wide-spread force.

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  4. You write very well. I enjoyed reading your article - well, I was saddened too. I've got friends in Japan too, and am glad that they, together with their family and friends are safe.

    Thanks for sharing the macro pics - the paint texture is amazing.

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  5. It is very sad, they are all in our thoughts.

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  6. I love your title, "not impossible to pray". We all pray for Japan and the people, it's so hard to see them suffer like this. Thank you for sharing this Laura. Happy Monday!
    Macro Monday

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  7. Laura, your words are so touching, especially how you integrated all that you experienced over the weekend into a beautiful circle of healing. May our prayers go round and round and never end, healing ourselves and others.

    (Your bracelet looks beautiful by the way!)

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  8. what a lovely post. you write very well and i felt my heart get heavy once more as I too thought about Japan.
    My heart and prayers go out to all who are suffering.

    your images are wonderful. I especially like the fact that you shared your beautiful mala beads with us.

    thank you for your wonderful post
    take care
    Hope

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  9. Always such lovely thoughtful insightful words. Thank you.
    The bracelet is beautiful!

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  10. My heart goes out to those in Japan. I enjoyed reading your post, and seeing the Picasso in macro. Well said.

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  11. It is so sad. I heard about it when I woke up and watched as Hawaii waited for the tsunami to hit them. Now we wait for the next round on Japan, I pray this one is small and does not cause further damage to an already devastated country.

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  12. Beautiful post. My thoughts these days are with the people of Japan.

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  13. Dear Laura, I almost do not dare to turn on the news anymore as i am so distressed and it bring so much sadness into my heart to see all this devastation, total destruction and the loss of lives. It is a terrible tragedy and it reinforces the fact that things can truly change so much in one simple day...
    Glad to hear though that your friends are fine.
    xoxo

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  14. Leslie above says it all, we need to take turns, to be there for each other. I have a bracelet from a good friend so similar to yours. I think I'll go put it on.

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  15. I am left breathless from reading your post, it is so strong and yet so soft. The way you put things into perspective and then into words is amazing. Beauty in the middle of devastation. Prayers for you and all who suffer fills my heart!

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  16. A poignant message to us all.

    My Macro Link: Sand Dollars and Sea Drift Seeds

    Hope you can visit; have a glorious day!!

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  17. My prayers have not ceased for the Japanese people. Your post is so beautifully written it melted in my soul. Thank you Laura.

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  18. Beautifully shared, Laura. Thank you for sharing your heart with us and for being a living inspiration..."embodying the sacred in every thing". I love yuo dear one..

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  19. So very true, Laura. The circles of life also enclose the circles of death...

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  20. oooh, i too love picasso!
    circling love from my little spot
    on the earth to yours,
    round & round.
    oxo

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  21. Lovely Laura..."Life and death shift seamlessly from the first inhale at birth to a final exhale"...as I wrote of spirals this morning, our hearts connected..._/\_

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  22. Being the lover of art as you already know i am, this is another post right up my alley. The colors are beautiful just like the red cushion. Thanks so much for you kind comments about having my hair shaved for childhood cancer research. Being that we did it as a family it was extra special. The fun part was that night when we all got back to Gene’s house and got a real good look at ourselves...we all had to laugh!

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  23. A different view, a different perspective, and always, life with a prayer.

    We are all profoundly saddened by Japan's great losses!

    Be blessed this fine day, in all ways, be blessed.

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  24. Love the Picasso...those circles...that expression...your relating to it...wheels...chair...broken...
    you don't sound so broken to me...but rather grounded...
    We all hold hands in healing prayer for those in Japan right now. So sad.

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  25. I'm again very much inspired by your post, Laura. I was shocked when I heard about it in the news because I was in Narita Airport in Tokyo five days before it happened.

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  26. Beautiful, Laura. Just beautiful.

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  27. Japan's tragedy numbed me too.
    A very well written post.

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  28. My blog friend from Japan hasn't answered but I still hope the best that she has survived. She might not have electricity and of course blog is not her first priority if she lives in disaster area.

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  29. Very nice post, Laura. It is so heartbreaking to see the news about Japan. My prayers goes out to all the people in Japan.

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  30. Yes the view we get from a wheelchair is different, but good sometimes. You showed it well. I do feel for Japan!
    kim

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  31. I believe in the power of praying, and it has consoled me many times..

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  32. I know, it's all quite overwhelming.

    Sending you a hug. This is Laura who made your wrist mala.

    I pray that all our prayers are helpful.

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  33. Sending a hug to you and everyone who prays for Japan and the world.
    Beautiful post.

    ((Hug))

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  34. I didn't mean to doublepost!
    Oops.

    Laura

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